Find a Mentor

02 Mar Find a Mentor

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Viacheslav Iacobchuk | Dreamstime.com

I know what you’re thinking. It’s like your thoughts are screaming at me through the WiFi as you’re reading this:

“I don’t know of anyone who can mentor me through all of this!” 

We all think what we’re going through has never been gone through by anyone since the beginning of time. We all think that we’re trailblazers and no one before us has ever had Big Plans and tried to put them into motion. The truth is, almost everything we’re going through currently as women in business has already been gone through before.

And probably by a woman in business you know and probably pretty recently, too.

That’s why it’s important to have a mentor. A mentor is essentially someone who’s been where your are now and has pushed through to the other side.  They can give you insight into how they navigated the difficult terrain of growing their business, managed employees or just kept themselves motivated and productive when they felt like just slacking off.

Don’t allow yourself to worry that you’re bothering them. Most of us (especially women who are leaders in business) hate to reach out and ask another women for some of her valuable time. We all know how valuable time is and we definitely don’t want to be a drain on someone else. I get it. But what you don’t realize is that at one point, that woman was probably mentored by someone and it was probably about this point in her journey, too. For that matter, she may be currently being mentored by someone and would love the opportunity to pass on the favor. A mentoring relationship can be rewarding for both parties.

So how do you go about finding a mentor?

Step #1: Identify a woman in your area that you either know or have a mutual friend or business associate in common. It is tempting to think that it needs to be a woman in your industry, but you would be surprised how much business knowledge can cross industry lines. For instance, if you’re a Realtor, you can still have a Financial Planner as a mentor. They are different industries but share many of the same business challenges.

Step #2: Reach out to her and invite her to coffee or lunch. During this time, you can casually lay out some situations in your business without being too detailed until you can gauge how she responds. You’ll know pretty quickly if this is someone you could be comfortable being vulnerable with and opening up to about your business challenges. If you feel this could be a good match, be honest with her. Let her know you are looking for a business mentor. She may be honored you asked her.

Step #3: Plan a regular meeting schedule with her. The only way you can feel connected to someone and feel like you don’t have to give a hour’s worth of background information everytime you meet, is to meet regularly. If you still feel uncomfortable taking her time, offer to buy lunch. After all, who would turn that down?

Finally, if you still feel like there is no one that makes sense to mentor you through your challenges in business, there are always people that you can hire to mentor you. The good news about these types of mentors is that they are professionals. They know exactly how to get to the crux of your issues and help you acheive your goals quickly.  The even better news is that I can make it easy for you. I’m one of those professional mentors with years of experience helping women just like you move forward on their path of success, and I would love to help you.

If you’re interested in my mentoring services, please email me at pat@pateardley.com and let me know what your struggling with. Let’s work through it together!

 

 

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